Abuse of a Power of Attorney is a Crime

According to the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging, too many criminal justice professionals lack awareness in the role they can play in holding offenders accountable. An agent who violates the duty owed to the principal may have committee one or more crimes. The agent may have violated state and federal laws, including laws on

  • Exploitation
  • Embezzlement
  • Forgery
  • Fraud (e.g. credit card fraud, tax fraud, welfare fraud)
  • Larceny
  • Money Laundering
  • Theft

The National Center on Elder Abuse provides resources for social service agencies and the justice system. They help with response and prevention strategies for elder and vulnerable adult abuse. While mistreatment of the elderly and adults with disabilities have traditionally been viewed as family matters, criminal justice systems are adapting to better address elder abuse and neglect as a criminal issue.

 

AARP’s Public Policy Institute has produced a report written by Lori A. Stiegel and Ellen M. Klem of the ABA Commission on Law and Aging. The report explores the problem of the abuse of powers of attorney and how state legislatures can provide protection. The report can be downloaded here.

Also, see a National Center of Elder Abuse Fact Sheet: Durable Power of Attorney Abuse: It’s a Crime Too.

 

Here in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, the Office of the District Attorney investigates and prosecutes elder abuse. In addition, abuse can be reported at the Lancaster County Office of Aging