This from Samantha E. Weissbluth writing for Wealth Management:

Gay son must marry woman to get inheritance

In a recent New York case, a father, in his will, dictated that his gay son’s child get nothing unless his son married the child’s mother.  Manhattan resident Frank Mandelbaum founded the ID verification company, Inteli-Check, and

Let’s say you got a divorce. As part of the divorce agreement your ex agreed to leave half of his estate to your kids. He dies. He leaves a will that doesn’t comply with the agreement – leaving 90% of his estate to his second wife. What happens? Enforce the contract you say, the kids get half. That’s what you and I think the answer should be. Maybe you have a divorce settlement with a similar provision. Will it hold up? That is the issue that has been tying up the Oleg Cassini estate for years.

Oleg Cassini, the fashion designer who made first lady Jackie Kennedy’s style the "single biggest fashion influence in history" died in 2006. Jackie had chosen Oleg Cassini as her exclusive couturier and called him her "Secretary of Style."

Cassini married film star Gene Tierney in 1941. Tierney, a very successful actress, was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in "Leave Her to Heaven." (The story is the basis for the plot in Agatha Christie’s murder mystery, Mirror Crack’d.) Tierney and Cassini had two daughters, Christina Belmont and Daria Cassini. When Tierney was in her first trimester of pregnancy carrying Daria, a fan with German measles broke her quarantine to shake hands with her favorite star, and Tierney unknowingly contracted the disease. Daria was born deaf, severely retarded and nearly blind.

When Cassini and Tierney divorced in 1952, the marriage termination agreement mandated that half of Mr. Cassini’s estate be split equally between the couple’s two daughters upon his death.


Continue Reading Is a Divorce Agreement That Promises an Inheritance to Kids Enforceable?

The executor of the estate of a Houston man who died in September 2010 filed a negligence and negligent misrepresentation suit against Baker Botts on Oct. 10, alleging the firm made an estate-planning error that will cost the estate more than $1 million.

Read more here.

The errror stems from failing to file

 

Philadelphia coin dealer Israel Switt died in 1990. In 2003, 13 years after Switt died, his daughter and grandsons drilled open a safe deposit box in Switt’s name and found 10 rare gold coins.

The coins were 1933 Saint-Gaudens double eagle $20 gold coins and were valued at approximately $80 million. The coin is

 

What is the value of a piece of art that cannot be sold? In the case of "Canyon" by artist Robert Rauschenberg, the IRS claims it is worth $65 million. They also want to tax the heirs who now own the artwork over $29 million.  

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